This Business of Writing

Posts Tagged ‘self-publish’

How to Get Your Self-Published Novel Reviewed

In General Information, How-to's, Marketing Your Book on April 16, 2010 at 8:13 am

by C. Patrick Schulze

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If you’ve decided to self-publish, you already realize every aspect of marketing your novel falls in your lap. And within the marketing arena, one of the most difficult things to accomplish is to have your self-published novel reviewed.  In this blog post, I’ll offer some tips on how to get your self-published novel reviewed and hope you find some that’ll work for you.

First, you need your marketing  pack, a sales tool all authors need. Your pack should include those same things a traditionally published author uses: a marketing post card, a professional head shot and letterhead for your author’s bio, information about your novel and blurbs. VistaPrint, among other shops, can do the printing of your marketing pieces. You’ll want to seek at least fifty reviews, so have that many packets on hand.

You want to have this material ready three to four months ahead of your pub date as that is when you’ll ask for your novel reviews. This means, of course, your book will not yet be published when you seek your reviews though you must have your completed novel in hand.

Okay, you’ve got your completed manuscript in hand and all marketing materials ready. Now, where do you get these coveted reviews?

Consider these sources:

Other authors in your genre

Organizations that relate to your novel

Bloggers Book review websites

Every major newspaper, especially your local rags

And of course, Amazon.com

While performing my research for this article, I found a number of websites that have self-published novel review sections. Take a look at:

Simegen

MidwestBookReview.com

BookReview.com

Midwest Book Review

Foreword Magazine

Reader Views

January Magazine

Critique Magazine

All Readers

The Compulsive Reader

Front Street Reviews

Self Published Authors

Book Ideas

Overbooked

Club Reading

Rebecca’s Reads

Breeni Books

All Book Reviews

Authors Den

TCM Reviews

American Book Review

Book Pleasures

Curled Up with a Good Book

Here are a couple of secrets to know when you contact these people or organizations. You should consider them individually in lieu of mass mailing to everyone. Many will have specific requirements you must follow for consideration and it’s in your best interest to follow those directions. Another secret is to seek out niche reviewers. They may have influence over those people who might have the most interest in your novel. And finally, I’m certain there’s no need to remind you that basic courtesy goes a long way when asking for reviews.

Now for a few more sites that may have more information on the subject.

Self Publishing Magazine

Indiebound.org

Self Publishing Review

By the way, here’s a link I found that tells you have to get your self-published novel into Barnes and Noble. http://www.absolutewrite.com/novels/how_to_get_your_self.htm

I hope you found something here to help you get your self-published book reviewed. If so, maybe it’ll help you achieved that best-seller status I wish for each of you.

C. Patrick Schulze
Author of the emerging novel, “Born to be Brothers”


Follow Up to: “Why I’ll Self-Publish – Probably.”

In The Craft of Writing on April 8, 2010 at 10:46 am

by C. Patrick Schulze

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Well, “they” say to write controversy and I’ve seemed to stir up a bit with yesterdays’ post on “Why I’ll Self-Publish – Probably.” I had hoped people would comment and offer their insights so as to fill in any gaps I may have missed. Well, I’ve missed one – a big one.

Though I received some lengthy comments, one paragraph from a specific comment is pasted below. This commenter offered me an important angle I had, indeed, missed. That one comment has me rethinking my conclusions. We’ll see.

Her comment:

“One thing that having an agent, publisher, and traditionally published book did for me was to provide me with cachet. That cachet led to many newspaper and magazine interviews, some radio, a local TV thing, and requests from major magazines for a couple of articles. The web site that I built to accompany the books has turned into quite a platform and also a source of modest income. I’m fairly sure that most of the success that I’ve had after publication has come from the fact that I was traditionally published.”

Ah, cachet! Her point is quite well taken. An old saw I believe in says “Image is everything.” Cachet is a strong part of image. Humm…

Anyone have any other thoughts?

As you know, I wish for you only best-sellers.

C. Patrick Schulze
Author of the emerging novel, “Born to be Brothers.”


Why I Will Self-Publish – Probably.

In General Information, Marketing Your Book, The Craft of Writing, Working with Agents on April 7, 2010 at 7:04 am

by C. Patrick Schulze

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I’m about to finalize my decision as to how I am will sell my emerging novel, “Born to be Brothers.” With that in mind, I must soon decide if I am to self-publish and endure all that entails or face the gauntlet of the publishing industry and all the rest that comes with that. (We have not chosen an easy industry, have we folks?

I see advantages with either scenario and I also see drawbacks with both. However, the more educated I become on the subject, the more it seems it is in my best interest is to go it alone. Here’s my train of thought. Please so advise if you disagree. I am open to an honest discussion on the matter.

Agents:

I like the idea of an agent who represents me and feel I have the capability to find a quality agent. That part doesn’t concern me. I really don’t like the process of how they choose the writers they represent. No, I agree with the query process. After all, even writers need a resume. What tweaks my cheeks is their query restrictions. One minor, unintended error that has nothing to do with the quality of your writing, and you’re only opportunity to have them read your resume is lost. Don’t get me wrong, they have to do this. I understand and even agree. I just don’t like it. I also consider how once I find the proper agent for me, will I be the proper author for them? The odds are quite limited. Why hang my future on such low odds when I have other options? However, the real rub? After I’m through with the exhaustive experience of agenting, then I have to deal with the pub houses.

Publishing Houses:

Publishing houses do ease, though not guarantee, entry into the brick and mortars, which are the premier distribution channel for the writing industry – for now. However, distribution is their only remaining asset of any real worth and with the explosion of technology, I see their grip on distribution slip with each day that passes. In fact, I believe the Internet is about to leave them in the dust and take over their monopoly with distribution. Amazon, a technology company, even affects their sales model. That’s not a sign that instills confidence in me relative to their strength or ever their stability within the writing world.

Another major issue I have with pub houses is they’ll hire some salesman who MAY give my book a ten second pitch. If he wants to. Honestly? I want that salesman to answer to me, not some conglomerate who sees me not as a customer but as a product. Again, I understand and have no solution for them, I just don’t like the system.

Further, there’s almost no chance for an advance, which means I work on commission – a commission based not on my productivity but some unknown salesman’s capability. Now, I’ve worked on commission before and made a bunch of money doing it. But I either held the salesman’s position or the salesman worked directly for me. Under their arrangement, I’ll most likely never even meet this person, let alone develop a relationship with him. And yet, my career hinges on his efforts. It’s a scary thought to someone like me who has always pulled up his own boots.

The pub houses will not assist with marketing, so that effort and expense lies with me regardless.

The pub houses sometimes offer editing services, but even that benefit is dying. Plus, I can purchase that service on the open market and have a say in whom I hire. They do have book cover design services and that’s nice, but I give up all control over how they present what, in the final analysis, is my work. Further, I can purchase that service on the outside at a reasonable price and maintain total control.

Something else of which I do not approve? The publishing industry is absolutely subjective and good novels are lost all the time to this limiting aspect. Again, I do understand and it can be no other way, but that also dilutes my potential to a great degree. Again, I could lose not on my abilities, but on a stranger’s tastes or even their emotions of the moment.

This whole process just does not send that proverbial tingle up my leg.

So as I see it, to work with a major pub house, I give up a huge portion of my potential profits in exchange for little more than a diminished distribution system based primarily upon old technology? Hum…

Self-Publishing:

I do have one advantage most writers do not. I’ve owned and operated my own businesses since the days of paper boys with bicycles. I’m experienced with going it alone and I’m comfortable with the idea. I will admit this aspect of who I am influences me a great deal.

The major drawback to self-publishing? All the issues rest with me. I don’t worry too much as I’ve been a business decision maker my entire adult life, so making these kind of judgments are sort of par for the course.

Cost. It’s a big issue. However, it won’t break the bank, so it’s not too large of an issue. Besides, my wife is on board, so the real hurdle is already crossed.

Marketing. This is a major issue with those who self-publish and beyond the well-written novel itself, it’s the meat and potatoes of success. However, I’ve been self-employed and marketing since I my tenth birthday. Though the cost of it is a consideration, the Internet has supplanted much of that cost. I can work up copy, build web sites, use social networking and all the rest. I’ve even got contacts.

Product: I do believe I’ve got my breakout novel in hand and am convinced my novel will sell with correct marketing. It’s a great story and the narrative is well written and well edited. In fact, I dare say it’s better than most books the pub houses crank out. I know… I know… we all feel that way about our babies, but I’ve written two stinkers, so I’ve got somewhat of a handle on good vs. bad. This one is good.

Publishers: I’m not too worried about that. I’m good enough at research and I’ll find a good print shop with benefits, which is really all they are. I used to own a wholesale print shop, so I have a feel for what to look for.

Editing: I’ve got a relationship with an excellent editor who is reasonably priced and brutally honest with me. Besides, I’ve grown into a pretty good editor myself over the years.

Book Cover Design: Graphic artists are everywhere and some are even reasonably priced. Besides, I’ve got some great ideas and I’d like to see them fleshed out.

Distribution. Now here’s the other of the three big issues which also included cost and marketing. Again, I’ll forgo the brick and mortars for the Internet any day. The B & M’s are a dying breed and the Internet allows me to get my marketing message into almost every home in the English-speaking world. I’ll have a worldwide market, which includes their customers. So again, marketing is the secret to distribution. By the way, have you noticed the B & M’s now sell the very products that will either kill their business model or force them to become something other than a book store? “Here’s yer sign.”

Profit potential? I’ve worked up a business plan and feel I’m actually ahead with self-publishing. Especially when you consider the digital end of things. I’ll not have the overhead the pub houses do so my business plan gives me an huge edge when I keep all the profits rather than some small percentage. I retired from the business of coaching other businesspeople and did so for many years. I have confidence in my plan.

So, that’s my way of thinking on this important writing decision. I challenge you to show me where I’m wrong.

In the mean time, how ‘bout some referrals to self-pub houses that have impressed you?

Thanks for your help.

C. Patrick Schulze
Author of the emerging novel, “Born to be Brothers.”